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SOWC 6101 WEEK 4 STUDENT REPLIES

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STUDENT REPLIES

Hello, I HAVE BELOW 2 STUDENT REPLIES THAT NEED TO BE ANSWERED BACK WITH A 150-WORD COUNT USING REFERENCES TO SUPPORT YOUR WORK. I WILL NEED AN 8 HR TURNAROUND ON THIS WORK. SO PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU GET IT BACK TO ME ON TIME. THANKS

STUDENT REPLY #1 Morgan Smith

In the realm of social work practice, understanding and applying skills for working with different types of groups is fundamental. Task groups, educational groups, support groups, and skills groups each have distinct purposes and focuses (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018, p. 102-137). As a social worker, I find great value in facilitating a teenage girls’ support group to address the unique challenges faced by this demographic.

In the professional role of facilitating a teenage girls support group, my responsibilities would encompass creating a safe and supportive space, guiding discussions, and providing emotional support and resources. This aligns with the facilitator’s role outlined by Kirst-Ashman and Hull (2018, p. 112), emphasizing the importance of maintaining a positive group atmosphere.

Group norms play a pivotal role in establishing the expectations and guidelines for behavior within a group. In the context of a teenage girls support group, I would adopt an inclusive approach by involving the group members in collaboratively formulating the “rules” of the group and a contract to abide by them. This participatory process empowers the teenagers, promoting a sense of ownership and adherence to the established norms (IASWG, 2015).

Group roles, as defined by Kirst-Ashman and Hull (2018), represent specific functions individuals take on within a group. An example of a group role is the “Supporter” who provides encouragement and empathy to other group members. In a teenage girls support group, a member might naturally take on this role to foster a supportive and nurturing environment, contributing to the overall well-being of the group.

As a group leader, I anticipate that the role of the “Challenge Seeker” could be particularly challenging. This group member may intentionally question or resist aspects of the group process, challenging the facilitator’s ability to maintain a balanced and cohesive group dynamic. Effectively managing this role requires a delicate balance between acknowledging differing perspectives and guiding the group towards constructive discussions (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018, p. 112).

References

Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H., Jr. (2018). Empowerment series: Understanding generalist practice (8th ed.). CENGAGE Learning.

International Association for Social Work with Groups. (2015). Standards for social work practice with groups (2nd ed.). IASWG.

STUDENT REPLY #2 Cara L Earle

Task groups are created to achieve a specific set of objectives or tasks (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). Educational groups are developed to foster education of the group, an example of this would be a monthly meeting of the American Academy of Professional Coders. At this meeting, the group participates in didactic presentations and discussions to continue their education in the field of medical coding. Support groups are another group type that consists of group members gathering to provide one another with emotional support and encourage one another to share issues, concerns, or problems while also supporting one another with coping mechanisms. Grief groups are common type of support group, where members gather together to help each other cope with the loss of friends or family members.

One type of treatment group that can be facilitated as a social worker is a Self-Help group. These groups are purposed to help members overcome a variety of problems, a common example being Alcoholic Anonymous. A social worker would be present as a facilitator or mediator in a self-help group. In either of these roles, the social worker would be able to help shape the group norms. In a treatment group, norms are defined as unwritten expectations about how individuals will act in certain situations (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). In the example of an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, the norms would include fostering a culture of openness, the social worker can model these characteristics in an effort to promote a positive environment that allows group members to feel comfortable sharing their stories.

Within a group, there are always group members that fall under maintenance roles and nonfunctional roles. As a group leader, I would find members falling under the nonfunctional role category the most challenging, specifically aggressive members. These members are likely to challenge the ideas and motives of the other group members (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). Aggression can easily get out of control and as a group leader, I would want to deter any aggression, while also allowing the group member to voice their concern/opinion respectfully.

Reference

Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H., Jr. (2018). Empowerment series: Understanding generalist practice (8th ed.). CENGAGE Learning.

SOWC 6101 WEEK 4 STUDENT REPLIES
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